Sprouted Focaccia Bread

Free Essential Oil E-Course

I’ve been sitting on this recipe for several weeks now. Most of the recipes I’ve posted over the past year have been grain free. The thing is, I don’t eat grain free…anymore. I ate grain free most of my pregnancy because I thought it would be best for my baby and I. But I love bread! And I feel sooo much better when I eat bread. I know that may sound weird, but its true. Healthy, properly prepared bread is full of vitamins and minerals and tastes amazing too!

I used sprouted spelt flour for this recipe. You can purchase this flour or make your own sprouted flour. I also always sift my flour. Sifting removes some of the bran, making for a lighter loaf. Sifting flour can also help prevent cavities . :)

This bread tastes wonderful with quality olive oil, balsamic vinegar and a glass of wine.

Sprouted Focaccia Bread

Ingredients
 
3 1/2 cups sprouted flour, sifted  - where to buy sprouted flour
1 organic russet potato
1/4 cup extra virgin olive oil – where to buy quality olive oil
1 cup warm water
1 1/2 teaspoons yeast
1 1/2 teaspoons salt – where to buy sea salt
3/4 teaspoon coarse sea salt 
 
Directions
 
1. Cut potato into 1 inch cubes. Boil potato in a small saucepan until tender, about  10 minutes. When the potato has cooled, use a box grater and grate potato. Set grated potato aside.
 
2. Use a standing mixer fitted with dough hook and mix sprouted flour (I used sprouted spelt flour), yeast, and salt together. With the mixer running on low, add water, 1 1/3 cups of grated potato and two tablespoons of olive oil. Mix until dough comes together.  Increase the speed to medium and knead the dough until smooth, about 10 minutes.
 
3. Turn dough out onto a clean counter and knead by hand until it is smooth and can be formed into a ball. Move dough into a greased bowl and cover until it is doubled in size, about 2 hours.
 
4. Press dough onto a greased 12×18-inch rimmed cookie sheet. Flatten and stretch the dough to cover the surface of the cookie sheet. Place in warm place and allow to rise until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
 
5. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Use your fingers to dimple the bread. Drizzle remaining olive oil over bread. Top with coarse sea salt. Bake until bread is golden brown and crisp, about 20 minutes. Cut into squares and serve warm.
 
this recipe is linked to Whole Foods Wednesday, Creative Juice Thursday, Simple Lives Thursday, Full Pate Thursday, Pennywise Platter, Fill Those Jars Friday, Fight Back Friday, Foodie Friday, Freaky Friday, Fresh Bites Friday, Fat Tuesday
Roots-Bottom

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About the author: Tiffany is a real food mama who lives in Oregon. She is a stay at home mom of three coconut babies. She is passionate about traditional and healing foods. As a true believer in the health benefits of coconut, she uses coconut products in almost all her cooking. Subscribe to The Coconut Mama’s Newsletter for more articles like this one.

4 comments… add one

  • Sarah October 4, 2012, 6:07 am

    This looks delicious! Thank you for this recipe. I can’t eat wheat because of a full blown allergy, but I feel like so many people in the gluten free, Paleo blogosphere attack all grains like they’re cyanide. But, like you, sometimes I feel like I need something carby and starchy, e.g. something grainy and bready! I can’t go too low carb/starch w/o crappy consequences (I like my hair to stay in my head). Anyway, I know my family will love this, so thanks again for sharing.

    Reply
    • The Coconut Mama October 4, 2012, 3:52 pm

      When I eat low carb/starch I don’t have any energy and I have panic attacks! I like to function throughout my day so carbs are a necessity :).

      Thanks Sarah :)

      Reply
  • Susan@learningandyearning October 4, 2012, 3:18 pm

    I definitely plant to try this. I have a regular flour sifter and I’ve tried sifting sprouted wheat flour to remove some of the bran but nothing was left in the sifter. What kind of sifter do you use?

    Reply
    • The Coconut Mama October 4, 2012, 3:55 pm

      Hi Susan,
      I use a fine mesh strainer. I got the idea from Sarah at The Healthy Home Economist. She says it works for her so I tried it and it worked great!

      Reply

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