Coconut Simple Syrup

How to make simple syrup with coconut sugar

Coconut sugar is the sweetener I use most often in my home. It has the loveliest toasted flavor that tastes delicious in baked goods.  It’s all natural, unrefined and is a sustainable sweetener source. Unlike refined sugar, coconut sugar contains trace amounts of vitamins and minerals like B vitamins, vitamin C and amino acids. Coconut sugar also scores low on the glycemic index, making it a preferable sweetener for those on low sugar diets.

When liquid sweetener is needed in a recipe I usually use raw honey or maple syrup. While I love honey and maple syrup, sometimes a less flavorful sweetener is needed. This is when coconut syrup comes in handy! I’ve been using it in place of raw honey in my coconut flour cookies, no bake almond joy cookies and in my homemade coconut milk ice cream. This sweetener works wonderful in place of those sweeteners!

How to make simple syrup with coconut sugar
Coconut Simple Syrup

Ingredients:

Instructions:

  1. Heat water over medium heat and bring it to a boil.
  2. Add coconut sugar to boiling water.
  3. Stir the syrup until a candy thermometer readers 230 degrees, 3-5 minutes.
  4. Remove the syrup from the heat and allow to cool.
  5. Store in storage container and refrigerate. This syrup keeps for up to 6 months in the refrigerator.
  6. Yields 1 cup of syrup.
Coconut Simple Syrup
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 cup coconut sugar
  • 1 cup water
Instructions
  1. Heat water over medium heat and bring it to a boil.
  2. Add coconut sugar to boiling water.
  3. Stir the syrup until a candy thermometer readers 230 degrees, 3-5 minutes.
  4. Remove the syrup from the heat and allow to cool.
  5. Store in storage container and refrigerate. This syrup keeps for up to 6 months in the refrigerator.
  6. Yields 1 cup of syrup.

Sources

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About the author: Hi! I’m Tiffany – aka Coconut Mama. I’m a real food mama of three coconut babies. I’m passionate about traditional and healing foods. As a true believer in the health benefits of coconut, I use coconut products in all my recipes. You can download my free Coconut Flour Recipes E-book here. Thanks for stopping by!
6 comments… add one
  • Anneliese September 21, 2016, 4:33 pm

    When you make the coconut ice cream with the coconut sugar syrup, how much of the syrup do you use? Thank you!

    Reply
  • Caroline Jayasuriya September 8, 2016, 6:36 pm

    The syrup is delicious. I like this better than maple or agave syrup as this is not as sweet. Thank you for sharing

    Reply
  • Kim McClain August 2, 2016, 6:17 pm

    Can I substitute coconut sugar syrup in a recipe that calls for brown rice syrup?

    Reply
  • Yoli March 7, 2016, 4:17 pm

    I’m trying to make a simple liquid sugar using my mix of Erythritol, Lohan and Xylitol. Can I use this recipe the same way??

    Reply
  • Nita January 18, 2015, 1:09 am

    Where do buy coconut sugar and how would you substitute it for regular sugar? My dietician recently put me on a low FODMAP, gluten free, lactose free diet for a few month. Boy, is it difficult! I am having a very difficult time finding bread that doesn’t have something I cannot eat so I would like to make my own bread, a few desserts, such as, snickerdoodle cookies and maybe a cake or something. Also do you by any chance have a recipe for Challah bread made with coconut flour that does not have honey in it or do you know a good substitute for honey. I cannot have honey either but can have table sugar or brown sugar.Thank you for your help. I have never been on a diet I. My life and this is an extremely difficult diet.

    Reply
  • Kitty March 24, 2014, 11:45 pm

    I found I love the taste of coconut sugar, when I tried it. However, it would be a good idea to go to tropical Traditions website and read their article on why they don’t offer it, for the other side of the story. There’s some reasons that suggest that the growing hunger for the “sustainable” sweet will eventually make the precious oil harder to get and therefore more expensive

    Reply

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